Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Your Right to Opt-Out of Sale of Your Personal Information

If you are a California resident, the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) gives you the right to opt-out of the sale of personal information about you or your household — such as, though not limited to, your name, postal or email address, IP address, and/or other personally identifying information — by a business. Once you’ve opted-out of the sale of your personal information by a business, the business is prohibited from selling personal information about you without your express authorization (and must wait at least 12 months before asking you for such authorization).

The right to opt-out is subject to a number of exemptions and exceptions. For example, it generally doesn’t apply to information shared with service providers (as the law and its associated regulations define that term) that process the information for certain business purposes, or to information that has been appropriately deidentified or aggregated.

Although I believe I do not meet any of the applicability thresholds specified by this California law, I am committed to providing visitors with as many privacy choices as I reasonably can.

The laws of certain other U.S. states (e.g., Nevada — see the “Nevada Consumer Opt-Out Rights” section of the Privacy Policy) may provide residents of those states with similar rights with respect to the sale of their personal information. However, other states’ laws may differ significantly from California law in the types of information to which such opt-out rights apply, in what is considered a “sale” of personal information subject to such rights, and in the exemptions and restrictions that may apply. Requests to exercise your rights under the privacy and/or data protection laws of a U.S. state OTHER than California, or of a country outside the U.S., should be submitted via any of the methods described in the “Controller/Responsible Party, Questions, and How to Reach Me” section of the Privacy Policy.

How to Opt-Out or Exercise Your Other California Privacy Rights

If you are a California resident and would like to opt-out of the sale of your personal information, and/or to exercise any of the other privacy rights provided by California law — e.g., to request to know about personal information collected, disclosed or sold, and/or request deletion of your personal information — you or your authorized agent can submit a request via the California Privacy Request Form or any of the other methods specified below. Once I have reviewed your submission, I will contact you to discuss the next steps involved in processing your request, which may require me to verify your identity — see the “Identity Verification Requirements” section toward the bottom of this page.

The law and/or its associated regulations specify the maximum time allowed for acknowledging and responding to each type of request. There is no charge for for making a request.

Except as otherwise required by law, requests pertaining to children under 18 should be submitted by a parent, legal guardian, or other authorized adult representative.

California Privacy Request Form

 

Anti-Spam Test

If you cannot or prefer not to use the above California Privacy Request Form, you or your authorized agent can also submit a request via email to admin (at) aaronseverson (dot) com or via postal mail to the following address:

Aaron Severson
Attn: Website Privacy Requests
11100 National Bl. #3
Los Angeles, CA 90064
USA

Requests submitted via email or postal mail should specify:

  1. Who you are, and:
  2. The nature of your request (e.g., to request to know what personal information I’ve collected about you, request to delete your personal information, and/or request to opt-out of the sale of your personal information), and:
  3. Whether your request:
    1. Pertains to your own personal information, or,
    2. Pertains to the personal information of your household (in which case all members of the household may need to make the request jointly), or,
    3. Is on behalf of someone else (in which case you’ll also need to provide proof that that person has authorized you to act on their behalf, or that you have the right to do so for some other reason, e.g., if you are a parent or legal guardian acting on behalf of your minor child), and:
  4. Whether you are a California resident, and:
  5. The best way(s) to contact you so that I can respond to your request and take any steps that may be required to verify your identity (see the “Identity Verification Requirements” section below).

Again, except as otherwise required by law, requests pertaining to children under 18 should be submitted by a parent, legal guardian, or other authorized adult representative.

Please keep in mind that, as with the right to opt-out, the other privacy rights provided by California law are subject to certain exemptions, exceptions, and restrictions provided by the law and/or its associated regulations. For more information about these rights, or to review my CCPA Information Collection and Sharing Notice (which describes the categories of personal information I may collect, the categories of sources from which such personal information may be collected, my purposes for collecting personal information, and how and why I may share personal information) and other disclosures, see the “Your California Privacy Rights” section of the Privacy Policy.

The CCPA and its associated regulations impose strict limits on the use and/or disclosure of information related to privacy requests. However, I may share information related to such requests to the extent permitted — and/or required — by applicable law and/or regulations for compliance purposes; to fulfill legal obligations (e.g., to respond to a subpoena or other court order); and/or to publish aggregate information about requests I receive, as described in the “Reports and Aggregate Statistics” section of the Privacy Policy (e.g., statistics on the total number of requests of each type I received during a given calendar year).

(To learn more about what kinds of personal information I may collect through and/or in connection with this website and how I may use and/or disclose that information, please consult the Privacy Policy.)

Identity Verification Requirements

Please note that I may be required to verify your identity before processing certain requests pertaining to your personal information. I may be unable to fulfill your request if I cannot verify your identity to the degree of certainty required by applicable law and/or regulations.

The identity verification process typically involves checking information you provide to me against information I already possess. This begins with my checking the information I receive when you submit your request (including both the information you provide and any information I collect automatically in connection with the request). I may also need to ask you some additional questions and/or request additional information in order to verify your identity and/or process your request. In some cases, I may ask you to sign and return a declaration form.

Additionally:

  • If your request is on behalf of another person, I may require (to the extent permitted — and/or required — by applicable law and/or regulations) that you provide proof that that person gave you signed permission to submit the request, and/or require that person to either verify their own identity directly with me or directly confirm with me that they authorized you to submit the request on their behalf.
  • If the request pertains to the personal information of a household rather than a single individual, I may be required to verify the identities of all household members to whose personal information the request pertains.

For a request to know or a request to delete, the current CCPA regulations require me to verify the requestor’s identity to either “a reasonable degree of certainty” (which may include matching at least two data points I have determined to be reliable for verification purposes) or “a reasonably high degree of certainty” (which may include matching at least three pieces of personal information I have determined to be reliable for verification purposes “together with a signed declaration under penalty of perjury that the requestor is the consumer whose personal information is the subject of the request”), depending on the type of request; the type, sensitivity, and value of the personal information involved; and the risk of harm to the consumer posed by unauthorized access or deletion.

If I ask for additional personal information I did not already posses in order to verify the requestor’s identity, the regulations prohibit me from using that additional personal information for any purpose other than verifying the requestor’s identity, security, or fraud prevention. After processing the request, I am only permitted to retain such additional personal information to the extent necessary to comply with the CCPA regulations’ record-keeping requirements.

Even if I verify the requestor’s identity to “a reasonably high degree of certainty,” the regulations prohibit me from disclosing certain pieces of sensitive personal information in response to a request to know. For example, if I possessed your Social Security number, I could not provide you with the actual number I possessed, only the fact that I possessed that information.

Requests by California consumers to opt-out of the sale of their personal information do not require these verification steps, although the current CCPA regulations permit me to deny a request to opt-out if I have “a good-faith, reasonable, and documented belief” that it is fraudulent. (If I deny a request to opt-out on this basis, the regulations require me to inform the requestor and explain why I believe the request is fraudulent.) The regulations also permit me to deny a request to opt-out submitted by an authorized agent on behalf of a consumer if the authorized agent cannot demonstrate that they have signed permission from the consumer authorizing them to act on the consumer’s behalf.

Privacy Preference Center

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I may sometimes present an alternative version of the sidebar offering different options, which may set the a11y-desaturated, a11y-high-contrast, and/or a11y-larger-fontsize cookies if you change those settings. These a11y cookies normally expire after about seven days, but are removed immediately if you restore the applicable settings to their default values.

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Password-Protected Posts

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Commenting

When you submit a comment, you may have the option save your information for future comments, storing the info in these cookies. (For each of these cookies, "xx" will be a cryptographic hash.) The cookies are not set at all unless you select that option when submitting a comment. They normally expire in just under one year, but you can delete the cookies in your browser (or other user agent) at any time. (These cookies are not usually set for administrative users, since comments they submit while logged in are associated with their user ID number and user profile information rather than a manually entered name and email address.)

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YouTube Videos

Embedded video players for content hosted on the YouTube video platform (which is owned by Google LLC) may set these third-party cookies and/or use similar technologies to store data in your browser (or other user agent) for purposes such as (without limitation) managing video settings (e.g., tailoring the playback to your connection speed), storing video preferences, providing certain functionality (e.g., allowing you to pause a video at a particular point), showing you advertisements, associating your video viewing and other activity with your Google account (if any), ensuring proper functioning of the service, and/or compiling user analytics data. Such cookies and/or stored data items may be set by various domains (such as, though not necessarily limited to, youtube.com; youtube-nocookie.com; googlevideo.com; ytimg.com; google.com; accounts.google.com; and/or doubleclick.net, which is part of the DoubleClick advertising service, also owned by Google LLC). Not all the listed cookies and/or data items are necessarily set in all instances, and there may sometimes be others not listed above, particularly if you are logged into a Google account. Some persist for only a few minutes, or until you close your browser (or other user agent); others may remain in your browser (or other user agent) as long as your individual settings permit. To learn more about what information the YouTube platform and other Google services may collect through and/or in connection with embedded video players and how Google may use that information, see their "How Google uses information from sites or apps that use our services" page and the Google Privacy Policy. For additional information about how Google uses cookies and/or other technologies that may collect and/or process personal information, see the "Technologies" section of their Google Privacy & Terms site. (Those pages do not currently discuss the storage of data in your browser (or other user agent) using technologies other than cookies, e.g., in web storage.) For more information about Google advertising, see the "Advertising" section of their Google Privacy & Terms site, which also discusses the use of cookies by Google advertising services. (Google, DoubleClick, YouTube, and other related marks and logos are trademarks of Google LLC.)

VISITOR_INFO1_LIVE, YSC, 1P_JAR, CONSENT, GED_PLAYLIST_ACTIVITY, GPS, PREF, LOGIN_INFO, remote_sid, use_hitbox, NID, IDE, ANID, APIS, SAPISID, DSID, HSD, SID, SSID, SNID, SIDCC, AID, CGIC, GAPS, GLC, N_T, OTZ, TAID, exchange_uid, test_cookie (cookies); Permission, yt.innertube::nextId, yt.innertube::requests, yt-html5-player-modules::subtitlesModuleData::display-settings, yt-html5-player-modules::subtitlesModuleData::module-enabled, ytidb::LAST_RESULT_ENTRY_KEY, yt-player-autonavstate, yt-player-bandaid-host, yt-player-bandwidth, yt-player-headers-readable, yt-player-lv, yt-player-quality, yt-player-volume, yt-remote-cast-available, yt-remote-cast-installed, yt-remote-connected-devices, yt-remote-device-id, yt-remote-fast-check-period, yt-remote-session-app, yt-remote-session-name, application_server_key, AuthKey, DeviceId, Endpoint, HighPriorityNotificationShowCount, HomePromptCount, HomePromptTime, IDToken, IndexedDBCheck, LogsDatabaseV2, P256dhKey, Permission, PromptTags, RegistrationTimestamp, shell_identifier_key, TimestampLowerBound, yt-serviceworker-metadata (other data items that may be stored in your browser or other user agent)

Vimeo Videos

These third-party cookies may be set in connection with embedded video players for content hosted on the Vimeo video platform, for purposes such as (without limitation) managing video settings, storing video preferences, providing certain functionality (e.g., allowing you to pause a video at a particular point), associating your video viewing and other activity with your Vimeo account (if you have one), showing you advertising, and/or compiling user analytics data. The cookies whose names begin with "_ga" and "_ut" are associated with the Google Analytics service (see their "How Google uses information from sites or apps that use our services" page, the "Information for Visitors of Sites and Apps Using Google Analytics" section of the Google Analytics "Safeguarding your data" help page, and the Google Privacy Policy for more information about how Google may use data gathered by this service; their "Google Analytics Cookie Usage on Websites" page provides additional technical information about the cookies the analytics service may use). Cookies whose names begin with "_ceg" are associated with the Crazy Egg web analytics service (which is subject to the Crazy Egg Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy). Cookies whose names begin with "optimizely" are associated with the Optimizely digital experience platform (which is subject to the Optimizely Privacy Policy; the "Privacy" section of the Optimizely Trust Center provides additional information about Optimizely privacy practices, including a link to the Data Processing Agreement that applies to personal data the Optimizely services process on customers' behalf that may be subject to certain regional privacy and/or data protection laws, while their "Cookies and localStorage in the Optimizely snippet" help page provides additional technical information about the cookies and/or similar technologies used by that platform). Cookies whose names begin with "adsense" or that are listed in all caps are associated with the Google AdSense advertising service and/or other Google advertising services (which are also subject to the Google Privacy Policy; for more information about Google advertising services, see their "How Google uses information from sites or apps that use our services" page and the "Advertising" section of their Google Privacy & Terms site, which also discusses the use of cookies by Google advertising services). The Vimeo Cookie Policy does not currently disclose the normal durations of the cookies and similar technologies that platform uses, but it appears that some may remain in your browser (or other user agent) for as long as your settings permit; some cookies set by the Google Analytics service can persist for up to two years. To learn more about what information the Vimeo platform collects and how that information may be used, see the Vimeo Privacy Policy. The Vimeo Cookie Policy also provides information about how Vimeo users can control the use of third-party analytics and/or advertising cookies in connection with embedded Vimeo video players. (Vimeo and the Vimeo logos are trademarks of Vimeo.com, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Google, AdSense, Google AdSense, Google Analytics, and other related marks are trademarks of Google LLC. Crazy Egg is a trademark of Crazy Egg, Inc. Optimizely is a registered trademark of Optimizely, Inc.)

_abexps, aka_debug, clips, continuous_play_v3, embed_preferences, has_logged_in, is_logged_in, jsessionID, player, search_click_position, Searchtoken, stats_end_date, stats_start_date, sst_aid, uid, v6f, vimeo, vuid, _ga, _gads, _utma, _utmb, _utmc, _utmv, _utmz,_ceg.s, _ceg.u, optimizelyBuckets, optimizelyEndUserId, optimizelySegments, adsense, adsenseReferralSourceId, adsenseReferralSubId, adsenseReferralUrl, adsenseReferralUrlQuery, S_adsense, APISID, GAPS, HSID, NID, N_T, PREF, SAPISID, SID, SNID, SSID

PayPal® Buttons

The payment or donation buttons that may appear on portions of the administrative dashboard (which is not normally accessible except to logged-in administrative users) contain embedded content served by PayPal® services. Those buttons may set the third-party cookies PYPF (via paypalobjects.com, which is owned by PayPal, Inc.), which appears to check whether or not you are a logged-in PayPal user, possibly to facilitate the PayPal user login process, and/or 01A1 (via abmr.net, which is owned by Akamai Technologies), which stores certain technical information about your device and browser (or other user agent), possibly to facilitate the login and shopping cart functions. The PYPF cookie normally expires in approximately four weeks, the 01A1 cookie in approximately one year.

Each PayPal payment or donation button may also incorporate a tracking pixel called "pixel.gif" (which loads from paypalobjects.com). A tracking pixel, sometimes known as a web beacon, is a tiny image file that loads from a remote server; it's a type of embedded content (as is the button itself, which loads from the same domain). The image file itself contains no personally identifying information, but the loading of that file may be used to help identify and/or track you.

If you use the buttons to make a payment or donation, the PayPal services will set additional cookies (not listed here) to manage your PayPal login and transaction data (and potentially also for various other purposes, e.g., user analytics and/or advertising). For more information about what data PayPal services collect and how that data may be used, visit the "Legal Agreements for PayPal Services" page to review the PayPal Privacy Statement and Statement on Cookies and Tracking Technologies that apply in your location (the Statement on Cookies and Tracking Technologies that applies to each region is linked from within the applicable PayPal Privacy Statement). For more information about how Akamai may collect, process, and/or use personal data, visit the Akamai "Privacy and Policies" page and Privacy Trust Center. (PayPal.com, PayPal, and all logos related to the PayPal services are either trademarks or registered trademarks of PayPal, Inc. or its licensors. In addition, all page headers, custom graphics, button icons, and scripts related to the PayPal services are service marks, trademarks, and/or trade dress of PayPal. Akamai is a registered trademark or service mark of Akamai Technologies, Inc. in the United States (Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off.).)

PYPF, 01A1